Teppanyaki Lover

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Teppanyaki is a way of cooking as teppan means iron pan and yaki indicates grilling in Japanese. The best part of having teppanyaki is that cooking and eating can be done in the same place. In other words, yes, u can watch the chef cooking in front of u. Great, isn’t it?

So recently, i have a huge desires to have teppanyaki, then i tried some Authentic Japanese Restaurant in Bandung. They are Okoh (Horison Hotel), Saisan, Momiji, Ginza, Azuma etc. But my favorite so far is Saisan and Okoh. The price is quite expensive, but u get full set menu. And it could be for 2-3 pax actually. U get full set menu from appetizers till dessert. U get Japanese salad, miso soup, mushrooms, konyaku, sweet potato, mixed vegetables, fried rice with chicken and egg, seafood (king prawn, fish, cuttlefish etc) or beef (u can have wagyu as well), salmon, and ice cream as the dessert. My favorite dessert is ice cream which is cooked on the pan (flambé) and it only available at Saisan i think. It was quite a show actually, watching the chef cooking in front of us, especially the flambé.image image image image image image image image image  image

Food Trends Prediction For 2013

 

 

 

 

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Popcorn

What is it? New frontiers in gourmet popcorn — unusual flavors, thoughtfully-sourced ingredients.

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Smoke

What is it? Smoke is being used to preserve and flavor ingredient food and drinks far afield of standbyes like trout and salmon: potatoes, bourbon, creme fraiche and even water, to name a few.

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Vegetables As Main Courses

What is it? Chefs bored by the same old seared pork chops and braised short ribs have been experimenting more and more with putting vegetables at the center of the plate rather than forcing them to play supporting roles, much to the delight of vegetarian diners.

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Fermentation

What is it? Foods like kimchi and sauerkraut have become extremely prominent due to their unusual meld of umami and sour tastes.

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Artisanal Bread

What is it? Restaurants and bakeries alike have been putting more effort into their bread baskets of late.

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Non-Alcoholic Beverages

What is it? As younger diners, pregnant women and non-drinkers visit high-end restaurants more often, they increasingly look for beverage options that don’t include booze but nonetheless taste interesting.

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Chef Collaborations

What is it? Chefs are increasingly coming out of the kitchen to make new kinds of food in concert with other chefs or with food companies.

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Barrel-Aged Hot Sauce

What is it? Like barrel-aged bourbon or wine, except hot sauce

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Winter Veggies, Served Fresh

What is it? Especially at high-end restaurants, vegetables that grow in the winter, like squashes, kale and turnip, have been served more frequently in preparations that are lighter and fresher than old staples like roasting and stewing.

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Chicken

What is it? With the price of beef, lamb & pork soaring, restaurants have increasingly looked toward luxurious preparations of chicken as a viable meat entree on moderately-priced menus.

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Gochujang

What is it? A Korean hot sauce that some thing could soon supplant sriracha as the red Asian condiment of choice.

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Cured Meat

What is it? Chefs and meat processors are still finding new ways to produce scrumptious varieties of salumi & charcuterie beyond things like prosciutto and pancetta.

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Tea

What is it? Some people think tea is the new coffee, and that we’re likely to see more varieties in the future.

How to eat fufu in Ghana, Africa

When traveling, experiencing the food of a culture can be one of the most exciting parts of the journey. Not only can you learn a lot about a group of people by their dining etiquette, but eating itself is fun.

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Recently, I was lucky enough to take a trip toGhana in Western Africa where dining rules and the cuisine itself differ greatly from that of Western culture. One specialty that is a local favorite, as well as a dish on every visitor’s list of foods to try, is fufu.

At first glance, fufu looks just like a lump of mashed potatoes sitting in some kind of soup. In your head you may picture yourself picking up a spoon, dipping it into the soft, creamy mound, and putting it into your mouth without a care in the world. Possibly it will taste buttery, and maybe there will even be some onions or chives in there.

If this is what you’re thinking, then you have never actually experienced fufu.

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Fufu is a cassava-based dish. Basically, the root-based plant is boiled in water then pounded down with a mortar and pestle. What you have now is a thick dough-like mixture that needs to be ferociously stirred, which usually takes two people, one pounding the fufu with the long, wooden pestle and the other reaching in and moving it around in between the pounding. As an outsider, I always found this a bit hard to watch, as it always looked like the person moving the fufu around was moments away from losing their arm.

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Once the mixture is completely smooth you shape it into smaller balls, which are usually put into a soup and served with meat. Each time I had fufu, it was served with fried chicken in groundnut soup, a spicy broth made with a peanut base.

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As most people who travel to Ghana will have their fufu made for them at a restaurant or someone’s house, the real task is knowing how to eat it. It is important to realize that in Ghana, eating with the left hand is considered extremely disrespectful. In this country, and many other Africa countries, your left hand is used for cleaning yourself (i.e. when you use the toilet) and the right hand is used for eating and handing things to others. Moreover, while Western dining etiquette places an emphasis on silverware, fufu, like much of the cuisine in Ghana, is eaten with the hands (the right hand, to be specific).

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Before dining, two bowls filled with water will be placed in front of you, one for washing your hands before the meal, and one for washing your hands after. To eat this dish, break off a small piece of the fufu and make a small indentation in it. Use this indentation to scoop up some of the soup, then place it in your mouth, and, without chewing, swallow. Yes, I said without chewing. I found this concept very difficult to grasp for some reason, as instinct tells most of us to chew our food. However, my Ghanian companion would scold me, saying, “You don’t need to chew it, it’s already soft!”

The texture is a lot like gum, as there is a stretchiness too it, but also a bit more doughy. While a bit flavorless itself, dipping it into the soup gives it a spicy peanut flavor while adding some consistency to the meal. Once you remember the etiquette and get used to eating soup with your hands, it becomes quite simple to enjoy this local Ghanian favorite.

German Artist Creates Art from Chaotic Splotches of Tea, Coffee and Juice

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Stains of coffee and fruit juice are dreaded by most people, but German artist Angela Mercedes Donna Otto actually uses them as the basis for her creative artworks. She randomly pours colored drinks on paper canvases and spends hours contemplating the splotches, looking for familiar shapes.

At the base of Angela Mercedes Donna Otto’s art is “apophenia”, a term used by psychologists to describe the pursuit of the human mind to construct meaning, order and forms even from chaotic structures (e.g. seeing faces and shapes in clouds). She starts the creative process by making random splotches of coffee, tea and various fruit juices on a paper canvas, to create all kinds of chaotic patterns. Then, she spends hours on end in her studio, contemplating the stains and using her imagination to identify meaningful patterns and shapes. Finally, the motifs she finds in the visually stimulant material are extracted from the patterns by drawing with colored ink. Though they are carefully worked out in detail her pictures provide a wide range of interpretation, different approaches and scope to “see more”.

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Bacon-Scented Shaving Cream Makes Men’s Mornings Smell Like Heaven

As if bacon perfume wasn’t enough to help people carry the smell of the tasty treat with them wherever they went, a Seattle-based food company has just launched a ’high end’ limited-edition Bacon Shaving Cream.

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Justin Esch and Dave Lefkow, the two man behind J&D Foods, have just released their newest idea – a bacon-scented shaving cream that will allegedly make users ’smell and feel like a champion’. Yup, the smell of bacon usually has that effect on people, but what I’d like to know is how does one restrain from having a taste of the heavenly-smelling shaving cream. After all, as inventor Justin Esch himself admits, “there is nothing more powerful than the smell of bacon, nothing.”  Company co-founder Dave Lefkow also wrote in a press release: ”Bacon Shaving Cream is a high end, luxurious bacon-scented shaving cream for all skin types. Our advanced heat-activated aromatic technology lasts for hours and delivers maximum bacon scent when you need it most.” He recommends using it after a hot shower or before an important date with a potential soul-mate. It will probably make them want to eat you up.

In the old days, people used bacon grease to shave their beards, and since the breakfast food is so hugely popular these days, a bacon-flavored shaving cream just made sense. And at $14.95 it’s a steal if you can’t get enough of that crispy treat smell. But you’d better act fast, as J&D have created just 2,500 jars of the delicious-smelling lather, and with the holidays just around the corner, they’re bound to sell like bacon hot cakes.

Even though Justin and Dave claim theirs is the world’s first bacon-scented shaving cream, there’s a Wisconsin-based shop called Mama Bears Shop that claims they’ve been selling a similar product since 2010.

Celebrity Portraits Made from 5,000 Sweets Taste as Good as They Look

Florida-based artist Cristiam Ramos creates portraits of celebrities like Marylin Monroe, Beyonce, Lady Gaga and Nicki Minaj out of thousands of sweets, giving the expression “eye candy” a whole new meaning.

The 32-year-old Mexican artist uses Gummy Bears, liquorice, M&M’s, bubble gum and after dinner mints to craft colorful portraits of various celebrities. Each of his tasty artworks contains over 5,000 individual sweets, and his largest creation so far, a life-size candy motorcycle is made up of over 20,000 sweets. Ramos says he got the idea to use sweets as a medium for his art four years ago, while he was in a park. He saw a dad give his son a piece of candy to sooth his pain, and after seeing the boy smile, he realized sweets make human beings happy. He kept thinking “what if they saw one of their favorite artists enshrined in their favorite sweets?”. That thought turned into a reality soon enough, and now Cristiam Ramos’ celebrity portraits sell for up to $18,000, depending on the size of the picture and amount of sweets used. Celebrities immortalized in candy by Ramos also include Justin Bieber, Michael Jackson and Elvis Presley. Believe it or not, there’s no paint used in any of them.

Photo: Cristiam Ramos/Barcroft Media

“I love and feel inspired to create different things with new materials,” the Mexican artist said. “My only desire as an artist is to convey to people the pleasure I feel in doing this work and that if ever anyone sees a work item out of the ordinary rest assured that is Cristiam Ramos.” His works have been displayed in museums around the world, and some can be admired in Ripley’s Odditoriums.

Photo: Cristiam Ramos/Barcroft Media

Photo: Cristiam Ramos/Ripley’s 

Photo: Cristiam Ramos/Ripley’s 

Louis Vuitton Family Launches Wine For The Chinese Palate

Louis Vuitton’s founding family has launched XLV, a range of wines specifically tailored to the Chinese palate.

Encompassing wines from the southern Rhône, Bordeaux and Champagne, XLV is named after fifth generation family member Xavier-Louis Vuitton, who owns a wine estate near Apt in the Vaucluse department of France.

Xavier-Louis’ son Quentin-Louis, who has taken on the role of cellar master, was at last week’s HKTDC International Wine & Spirits Fair to introduce the range. Describing wine as “a passion I inherited from my father”, he explained: “I made many trips to Asia to understand the Asian palate.”

As a result, the family has worked with business partner and vineyard manager Gael Vachet to create a range that aims to capture the fruit-driven style and softer tannins that Vuitton found appeals to Chinese consumers, who will form the primary initial target market for the XLV wines.

Tommy Wong, who is managing XLV’s distribution explained the appeal of the Vuittons’ close connection to this project. “The family is involved and that is important. In China trust is important – there are many imitations, but this brand can be trusted.”

Although the XLV team emphasised that its project has no connection with the Louis Vuitton brand, which is now owned by LVMH, the popularity of this luxury fashion house in China is likely to provide a useful connection for the Vuitton family in building a following for its wines.

As for the decision to launch the brand in Hong Kong rather than mainland China, Wong highlighted the administrative region’s role as a hub for the Asian wine trade, saying: “If you want to be in the Chinese market, the first step is to be here in Hong Kong.”

While the Ventoux wine is made from the Vuitton estate’s own grapes, the family works with growers for its other wines. These come from fellow southern Rhône appellation Châteauneuf du Pape, the Bordeaux appellations of Pomerol, Pauillac, St Estephe, Pessac and Margaux, and finally Champagne, where the brand has a Grand Cru blanc de blancs from Verzenay.

Currently sold through Hong Kong-based online retailer yeswine.com, prices range from HK$360 (£29) for the XLV Ventoux 2010 up to HK$2,450 (£199) for the XLV Pauillac 2007.

Emphasising a focus on “the most prestigious wine regions of France” Quentin-Louis hinted at future expansion plans for the brand. “People are asking for a Côte Rôtie”, he observed, but indicated that any such extension would be “two to five years” away.